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Full text of "Apple Manual: wishbringer"

"Excellent, excellent, excellent, excellent, excellent, excellent." 

Bob, 39 

Lyndhurst, Ohio 

"1 like this new style of game— who needs graphics?" 

Rachel, 13 
Arlington, Texas 

1 ' Four games really get you to me your thinking cap." 

Larry, 12 
Freehold, New Jersey 

"J hate to turn the computer off." 

Shirley, 34 
Baltimore, Man land 

'If ! go crazy or become a bum, it 'sail your fault. I hope you're happy, 

(P.S. It's great.)" 

Stu,49 
Lockport, New York 

"Unlike the arcade games that Utter the market, there are few copiers of 
Infocom 's interactive fiction. Can it be done? Probably. Can it be done as well 
as Infocom does it, or better? Unlikely. With each new game, Infocom is 
further entrenched in their position as manufacturer of the most unique, 
highest-quality software available on the market today." 
ANALOG COMPUTING magazine 

"It ruined my party! Everyone was upstairs playing! (i.e., GREAT!!) 

Walter t 25 
Wichita, Kansas 

* 'We have said it again and again: Infocom can 't be beat. For richness of 
description, unfolding of storyline, sharpness of wit, and challenge of puzzles, 
Infocom has no equal in the software business" 
CREATtVE COMPUTING magazine 

"Stop reading this and deliver that envelope! " 

"Corky" Crisp, Postmaster 
Festeron, Antharia 



LOCAL HISTORY SERIES 
No. 4 




LEGEND 



OF 



WISHBRINGER 



^9 




Reprinted by the Historical Museum 
of the Festeron Free Public Library 

Violet Voss, Curator 





FESTERON TOWN LIBRARY 



12 11 bl 


05/14/23 




01/32/64 


07/07/53 




01/18/70 


11/12/54 




10/10/88 


09/20/57 




03/01/96 






06/31/* 2 






10/24/19 







Please take care of me . . . 
libra ry books belong lo everyone. 



LOCAL HISTORY SERIES 



No. 4 



A Moral History, in Verse, 
of the 

MAGICK 
DREAM-STONE 

recently unearthed by the 
Society of Thaumaturgic Archaeology, 
and commonly known as 

WISHBRINGER 



including a substantial body 
of hitherto unpublished discoveries 
regarding the mystical properties 
of said Artifact. 




CHAPTER THE FIRST 

( )i Morning-Star's birth and great beauty, 
and flow she was abducted by the envious Queen Alexis. 




t happened in the reign of mighty 
Jt. Anatinus, King of Misty Island, 
i that there was born into 



f I a peasant home a daughter, 



blessed with rare and 



perfect Beauty. Morning-Star 



they named her; and the legend of her beauty 
spread through all the kingdom, even 
to the court of Anatinus. 

There beside the throne sat Queen Alexis, 
heavy-hearted. For her newborn daughter, 
cursed by fate and prophecy was sightless. 
Loth the Queen to look upon her blind child's 
face! And how the baby Morning- Star, 
more beautiful and perfect, made her jealous! 

Envy breedeth Evil: Queen Alexis 

caused the simple peasant home of Morning-Star 

to burn. The sleeping family perished, 

all but Morning-Star, who, being rescued 

by the Queen's design, became her daughter, 

sight restored by Prayer. 

(The one true Princess, 

left behind to fill the vacant cradle, 

perished too, and never saw her mother.) 



CHAPTER THE SECOND 

Of Morning-Star's coming ul age, and ot the many knights 
who sought her fair hand in Marriage. 




he years were kind 
to Morning-Star. Her beauty 
blossomed like the fragrant water-lily 
into full, abundant maidenhood. 
Anon befell her ten-and-seventh 
birthday, 

Anatinus made it known that whosoever 
might desire to win the hand of 
Morning-Star, should now come forth to claim it. 
To prove his worth, the groom must first by needs 
fulfill a Love-Quest, of the Queens own choosing, 
according to the custom of the kingdom. 

Many were the eager knights who journeyed 
to the royal palace, hoping there to 
win the love of Princess Morning-Star. 
Alexis, dark with envy, watched the lusty 
swains descend like vultures round her daught 
and vowed in secret not to let them have her. 

From the knights assembled, 
Six were chosen, and stood before 
the heartless Queen for testing. A 




CHAPTER THE THIRD 



Of the impossible Love-Quests devised by the crafty Queen Alexis, 
and how the six knights tared by them. 




ne brave knight, a lad 
^ but one-and-twenty, was sent 
across the sea to beg 
Lord Nimbus, God of Rain, 
to quench the thirsting fields 
of Frotzen. But the God, 
not sympathetic, smote his vessel with 
a bolt of lightning. 

The second knight, a weapons-bearer, strong 
of limb and spirit, scaled the mountain peak of 
Matter-Horn, to seek Advice from spirits. 
The hopes of Princess Morning-Star fell with him. 

A third knight ventured forth to try the fabled 
Wings of Icarus, and learn the secret 
method of their Flight, to please Alexis. 
But alas! the joyful knight, whilst soaring 
home to claim the Princess, flew into 
the open maw of Thermofax, a Dragon. 



Alexis sent the fourth knight deep into the 
Mines of Mendon, there to slay a Grue, 
and drag the carcass up where all might see it. 
But Darkness overcame the hapless knight, who, 
lost without a lamp, was soon Devoured. 

Another knight, the fifth, directed by the 
Queen to steal the Cocoa-Nut of Quendor, 
chanced upon a lair of hungry I m pie men tors, 
and did not Foresee his peril. 

Lastly stood before the Queen a gentle 

boy, no older than the Princess. Morning-Star 

liked well his beardless smile, and begged her 

mother not to test his Luck too harshly. 

But Alexis caused the youth to spend an 

evening midst an unclean Cemetery, 

from whence he ne'er returned; for eldritch Vapors 

carried him away, and gave no reason. 



C H A P T E R THE F O U RTH 

Of the Edict of Alexis, the demise of Morning-Star, and the discovery, 
many years alter, of a Magick Stone, called Wishbringcr. 




ueen Alexis cried, "Is no man 
in the kingdom fit to wed 

my only daughter? 
Methinks she must remain 
unmarried, then, and Virgin 
all her days." So was it Written. 

Morning-Star^^^^. hoped death might grant 
her Freedom from the Edict of Alexis, 
by her mother's timely passing. But the Reaper 
(busy elsewhere with a Plague) heard not her 
praying; so Alexis lived, and laughed, and 
watched her daughter's beauty fade away, 
and all her Wishes dwindle in her bosom. 



Many kingdoms after, when the reign of 

Anatinus was forgotten, and the 

names of Morning-Star and Queen Alexis 

lost in Time, there came unto the Misty Isle 

a Scholar, who, amid the crumbling 

tombs of monarchs, chanced upon the mortal 

relic of the Princess. All was Dust, 

except her Heart, which, hard and shrunken to a 

pebble in the grave, was shining brightly 

with the stifled Wishes of her lifetime. 



Thus, the Magick Stone of Dreams discovered. 



CHAPTER THE FIFTH 

Oi the Seven Wishes, 
and what ye must know to invoke them. 




£ and lost forever. Also know, 



even is the number 



of the Wishes bound into 
the Stone; and if ye speak 
a Wish, that wish is Spent, 



l^^^^r -' ' that ye must hold the 
Wishing-Stonc within thy hands to wield its Magick. 
Look ye, then, upon the Seven Wishes: 

RAIN falls only for the bearer of the 
Stone who standeth under an Umbrella. 

ADVICE may bring wise counsel to the bearer 
of the Stone who listeneth to Sea-Shells. 

FLIGHT shall bear the Magick-wielder swiftly 
home, if ye be sitting on a Broom-Stick. 

DARKNESS, blacker than the Night, shall fall 
across the land if Milk of Grue thou drinkest. 

FORESIGHT lifts the veil of Time, and shows 
the Future, but prepare thy eyes with Glasses. 

LUCK will bring good Fortune, if ye hold 
a Horseshoe and the Stone in thy possession. 

FREEDOM springs the dreamer from confinement, 
but mark well that ye first hath eaten Candy. 



EPILOGUE 



Now ye know the Origins 
and Magick 
of the Wishing-Stone. 
But know ye also, 
bold Adventurer, 
that every problem 
ye encounter in thy travels 
may be also bested 
by the spell of Logick, 
Exercise thy Brain, 
and work thy Wits! 
Forget ye not that Morning-Star, 
a Princess, 
who threw away her Youth 
in easy Wishing, 
died in vain. 
Let her fate be thy Warning. 



Mutato nomine, de te fabula narratur. 



Instruction Manual for 

Wishbringer™ 

Welcome to the world of Infocom's interactive 
fiction, a world where: 

• Yon are the hero or heroine in a story, 

• You use your own thinking and ima>jinati< >n to guide 
the story from start to finish, 

• You meet other people, who may or may not help 
you, and 

• You can go to new places, figure out mysteries and 
puzzles, and fight against enemies. 

In Wishbringer, you're a postal clerk in a small 
seaside village called Festeron. You deliver a strange 
envelope to a magic shop, and discover that an old 
woman's black cat has been kidnapped by "the Evil 
One." The old woman asks for your help, and when 
you leave the magic shop, you find yourself trapped 
in a nightmare world. Your once-quiet town is now 
full of nasty trolls, vultures, fortress-like towers, 
and assorted wickedness. You become entangled in 
the struggle between Good and Evil; extraordinary 
help is found only in unusual places. Others seek 
to possess a magic stone of dreams known as 
Wishbringer; but only you can find it and use its 
powers to make your town safe again. And you only 
have a few r hours! 

II you're experienced with Infocom's interactive 
fiction, you may not feel like reading this entire man- 
ual. However, you should at least read about wishing 
for magic (on page 16). Also look at the appendix of 
recognized verbs (on page 19); some of them can be 
used in all Infocom stories, but others are special for 
Wishbringer. If you study the postal map (included in 
your package), you will know where you are and 
where you can go. That will make it easier to decide 
what to do next. 



Table of Contents 

An Overview Page 12 

• What is interactive fiction? 

• Moving around 

• Turns and scoring 

Tips for Novices 13 
Nine useful pointers about interactive fiction 

Communicating with Wishbringer 14 

• Basic sentences 

• Complex sentences 

• Why doesn't it know T that word? 

Wishing for Magic 1 6 

Starting and Stopping 17 

• Starting WishMngar ("Booting up") 

• Saving and restoring 

• Quitting and restarting 

Appendix A: Important Commands 18 

Appendix B: Some Recognized Verbs 19 

Appendix C: Wishbringer Complaints 20 

Appendix D: Sample Transcript and Map 21 

Appendix E: We're Never Satisfied 23 

Appendix F; If You Have Technical Problems 23 

Appendix G: About the Author 24 

Ap pe ndi x H : C op yright an d Warranty 2 4 

Information 

Appendix I: Quick Reference Guide 

This briefly describes the most important 
things to know about interactive fiction. It is 
vital that you know all these things before you 
begin your adventure. 



25 



Instruction Manual 11 



An Overview 

Interactive fiction is a story in which you are the main 
character. Your own thinking and imagination guide 
the actions of that character and guide the story from 
start to finish. 

Each of Infocom's interactive stories, such as 
Wishbringer, tells you about a series of places, 
items, characters, and events. You can interact with 
these in many ways. 

To move from place to place, type the direction 
you want to go. When you go into a new place, read 
about it carefully. There may be something interest- 
ing or useful (or dangerous) there! You will find it 
helpful to make a map of the geography as you move 
around. 



An important part of interactive fiction is solving 
puzzles. If you find a locked door or a ferocious beast 
in the story, don't think of it as an obstacle; it s just a 
puzzle to be tackled. Sometimes the best way to 
solve a puzzle is to find something in the story, then 
take it with you and use it in the right way. 

When you play Wishbringer, the story goes on 
only from the time you press the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key until you see the prompt ( > ). You could imagine 
a clock that ticks once for each sentence you type, 
and the story continues only at each tick. Nothing 
happens until you type a sentence and press the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key, so you can think and plan 
your turns as slowly and carefully as you want . 

Wishbringer keeps track of your score and gives 
you points when it thinks you have done something 
"right" You may get points for solving puzzles, do- 
ing certain tilings, or visiting certain places. You can 
try to get a perfect score if you want, but you can 
also try to guide the story to an ending that you like 
and to have fun along the way. 



12 Instruction Manual 



Tips for Novices 

1. Draw a map. It should include each location, the 
directions connecting it to other locations, and any 
interesting objects there. (See the small sample map 
that goes along with the sample transcript on page 
21.) Note that there are 6 possible directions 
(NORTH, EAST, SOUTH, WEST, UP, and DOWN) 
plus IN and OUT. 

2. Many things that you'll discover in Wishbringer 
are important because they give you clues about the 
puzzles you want to solve. So examine anything and 
every thing that you come across. Most of the ob- 
jects that you can pick up in the story are useful for 
solving one or more of the puzzles. 

3. Save your place often. That way, if you mess up or 
get 44 killed." you won't have to start over from the 
beginning. See page 17 for instructions. 

4. Read the story carefully. Often there are clues in 
the descriptions of places and objects, as well as in 
signs, messages, and so on. You should examine or 
read anything that might be important. Even a silly 
or dangerous action may give you a clue, and it might 
even be fun! You can always save your place first if 
you want. Here's a silly example: 

> GIVE THE ROLLER SKATES TO THE VULTURE 
The vulture attempts to eat the roller skates, but eventu- 
ally gives up. It continues to peck you on the head. 

Here you have learned that this vulture doesn't like 
to eat roller skates, and you have a clue that maybe 
giving something else to the vulture (some raw 
meat?) would be better. 

5. Unlike other "adventure games" that you may 
have played, there are many ways to get to the end 
of Wishbringer. Some puzzles that you find along the 
way may have more than one solution; and you may 
not need to solve others at all. Sometimes solving a 
puzzle one way will make it harder to solve another, 
arid sometimes it will make it easier. 



6* You'll like playing Wkhbringer with a friend, be- 
cause different people may find different puzzles 
easy or hard. So two or more players can often have 
more fun, and do better, than one player alone. 

7. If you really have trouble, you can order a hint 
booklet from Infocom by filling out and mailing the 
order form in your package. You don't need this 
booklet to enjoy the story, but it will make solving 
the puzzles easier. 

8. Read the sample transcript on page 21 to get a 
feeling for how InfoconYs interactive fiction works, 

9. You can word a command in many different ways. 
For example, if you wanted to pick up a shiny ham- 
mer that was sitting on a table, you could type any of 
the following: 

>TAKE HAMMER 

> TAKE THE HAMMER FROM THE TABLE 

> PICK UP THE SHINY HAMMER 

> GET THE HAMMER 

In fact , if the hammer is the only object there that 
you can take, just typing TAKE would be enough. But 
more about that in the next section . . , 



Instruction Manual 13 



Communicating with Wishbringer 

In Wishbringer, you type your sentence in plain En- 
glish each time you see the prompt (> ). Wishbringer 
usually acts as if your sentence begins "I want to . . . ," 
although you shouldn't actually type those words. 
You can use words like THE if you want, and you can 
use capital letters if you want; Wtshbrifiger doesn't 
care either way. 

When you have finished typing a sentence, press 
the RETURN (or ENTER) key. Wishbringer will re- 
spond, telling you whether your request is possible 
at this point in the story, and what happened as a 
result. 

Wishbringer looks only at the first six letters of 
your words, and it ignores any letters after the sixth. 
So LIBRARy, LIBRARies, and LIBRARian would look like 
the same word to Wisfibrittger. 

To move around, just type the compass direction 
in which vou want to go. You can use four compass 
directions: NORTH, EAST, SOUTH, and WEST. Or^ 
you can use these abbreviations: N, E, S, and W. You 
can also use UP (or U), DOWN (or D), IN, and OUT. 
You don't need to walk around or turn around in a 
place; anything that you can see there is within your 
reach. 



Wishbringer understands many different kinds of 
sentences. Here are some examples. You may not 
actually use these commands in Wishbringer, but 
you'll centainly use commands like them in the story. 

> WALK NORTH 
>DOWN 
>GOUP 

>TAKE THE FOUR-LEAF CLOVER 

> PUT ON THE HAT 
>WISH FOR RAIN 

> LOOK UNDER THE GLASS CASE 

> DROPTHE ENVELOPE ONTOTHE COUNTER 

> EXAMINE THE PELICAN 

> PUSH THE RED BUTTON 

> LOOK AT THE TREE 

>WALK INTO THE POLICE STATION 
>GO IN THE POSTOFFICE 

> GIVE THE BOOK TO THE LIBRARIAN 

If you want to TAKE or DROP more than one ob- 
ject, you can do it in one command by separating the 
objects with a comma or the word AND. Here are 
some examples: 

>TAKE THE BLACK UMBRELLA, THE HAT, ANDTHE 
COIN 

> DROPTHE LETTER ANDTHE ENVELOPE 



14 Instruction Manual 



You can type several sentences on one line if you 
separate them by the word THEN or by a period. 
(Each sentence will still count as a turn.) You don t 
need a period at the end of the line. If Wishbringer 
doesn't understand one of the sentences, or if some- 
thing unusual happens, it will ignore the rest of your 
input line (see "Wishbringer Complaints" on page 
20). For example, you could type all of these sen- 
tences at once, before pressing the RETURN (or 
ENTER) key: 

> OPEN THE MAILBOX THEN PUT THE LETTER fN IT. 

CLOSE THE MAILBOX THEN GO SOUTH THEN 
TAKE THE GLASS OF WATER THEN GO NORTH. 
DRINK THE WATER 

The words IT, HIM. and HER can be very useful. 
For example: 

> TAKE THE BOX. OPEN IT. PUT IT ON THE TABLE 

> CLOSE THE HEAVY METAL DOOR. LOCK IT 

> KNOCK ON THE LIBRARY DOOR THEN OPEN IT 

> GIVE TH E LETTER TO THE WOMAN THEN ASK 

HER FOR A BOOK 

You'll meet many people and creatures in 
Wishbringer. You can ask them questions or talk to 
them like this: 

> ASK MISS VOSS ABOUT THE VIOLET NOTE 

> ASK SERGEANT MACGUFFJN FOR THE 

CHOCOLATE 

> QU ESTION TH E OLD WOMAN 

> BETTY, TELL ME ABOUT STEVE 
>GRAVEDIGGER, UNLOCK THE GATE 

> ALICE, SIT DOWN 

But remember: Most people in the story don't have 
time for idle chatter. Your deeds will speak louder 
than your words. 



Wishbringer tries to guess what you really mean if 
you don't give enough information. For example, if 
you type that you want to do something, but not 
what you want to do it to or with, Wishbringer may 
decide that there is only one possible thing that you 
could mean. When it does this, it will tell you. For 
example: 

> GIVE TROMBONE 

(to the musician) 

The musician accepts your kind gift and starts playing 
"Dixie." 

If your sentence is not clear enough, Wishbringer 
will ask what you really mean. You can answer by 
typing just the missing information, not the whole 
sentence again. You can do this only at the very next 
prompt. For example: 

>OPEN THE DOOR 

(Which door do you mean, the sliding door or the stor- 
age room door?) 

> SLIDING 

The sliding door is now open. 

Wishbringer uses many w T ords in its descriptions 
that it will not recognize in your sentences. For ex- 
ample, you might read, "Sunlight shimmers across the 
dusty cobwebs. "' However, if Wishbringer doesn't 
recognize the words SUNLIGHT or COBWEBS when 
you type them, then you know that you don't need 
them to finish the story; they just give you a more 
vivid description of where you are or what is going 
on. Wishbringer recognizes over 1000 words, nearly 
all that you are likely to use in your sentences. If 
Wishbringer doesn't know a word you used, or any 
word that means the same, you are almost certainly 
trying to do something that you don't need to do. 



Instruction Manual 15 



Wishing for Magic 

Wishbringer is a powerful and magical stone. If 
you're holding Wishbringer, you can make seven 
special wishes come true. You can wish for ADVICE, 
DARKNESS, FLIGHT, FORESIGHT, FREEDOM, LUCK, 
or RAIN. You wish for these simply by typing WISH 
FOR ADVICE, WISH FOR DARKNESS, etc. 

However, you need more than the stone to make 
the wishes come true. According to The Legend of 
Wishbringer, you also need a different object for each 
wish. These are described below. 

To WISH FOR ADVICE, you need both Wishbringer 
and a sea shell. As long as you're holding both, 
vou '11 continue to receive ADVICE periodically. 

To WISH FOR DARKNESS, you need to drink 
grue's milk and hold the stone. You must WISH FOR 
DARKNESS soon after drinking the milk; otherwise 
the wish won't come true. 

To WISH FOR FLIGHT, you need to sit on a broom- 
stick while holding the stone. In the story, flying on 
the broomstick will always take you to the Magick 
Shoppe. 



To WISH FOR FORESIGHT, you must be holding 
the stone while wearing a pair of glasses. Your wish 
won't come true if you're simply holding the glasses; 
vou must be wearing them. 

To WISH FOR FREEDOM, vou must hold the stone 
and eat candy. Like DARKNESS, you have to WISH 
FOR FREEDOM soon after eating the candy; other- 
wise vour wish won't come true. 

To WISH FOR LUCK, you must be holding both the 
stone and a horseshoe. Your luck will be broken 
whenever you drop either the horseshoe or the 
stone, but will come back whenever you pick them 
up again. 

To WISH FOR RAIN, you need to be holding an 
open umbrella and the stone. This wish won't work 
indoors. 

Remember that most wishes can be used only 
once. If you get trapped and use your WISH FOR 
FREEDOM successfully, you won't be able to use it 
again later. So use your washes carefully; you don t 
want to waste them. 



16 Instruction Manual 



Starting and Stopping 

Starting the story: Now that you know what to expect 
in Wtshbringer, it's time for you to "boot" your disk. 
To load Wishhritiger, follow the instructions on the 
Reference Card in your package. 

First the program will display the title of the story, 
followed by the first bit of action and a description of 
the place where the story begins. (Your Reference 
J teUs what to do when a full screen of lines rolls 
by and the program waits until you're ready to go 
on.) Then the prompt ( > ) will appear. The prompt 
(>) means that Wishhringer is ready for your 
command. 

Each time you finish typing a command, press the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key. The program will carry out 
your command(s), and another prompt will appear. 

Here is a quick exercise to help you get used to 
Wishhringer. For your first command after the story 
begins, type in next to the prompt ( > ): 
GO WEST 

Then press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. 
1 1 ishbringer will respond with: 
Outside Cemetery 

You're standing next to an open iron gate that leads 
west into the Festeron Cemetery. A road runs east to the 
top of Post Office Hill. 
What next? 

Maybe you'd like to try climbing the gate, so at the 
next prompt (>) type: 

CLIMB TH E GATE 

After you press the RETURN (or ENTER) key, 
Wishbringer w\W respond: 

The iron gate is much too high! 



Saving and restoring: It will probably take you many 
days to finish Wishbringer. If you use the SAVE com- 
mand, you can continue at another time without 
having to start over from the beginning, just as you 
can put a bookmark in a book you are reading. The 
SAVE command puts a "snapshot" of your place in 
the story onto another disk. If you are cautious, you 
may want to save your place before (or after) trying 
something dangerous or tricky. That way, you can go 
back to that point later, even if you have gotten lost 
or "killed" since then. 

To save your place in the story, tvpe SAVE at the 
prompt ( > }, and then press the'REtURN (or ENTER) 
key. Then follow the instructions for saving and re- 
storing on your Reference Card. Most computers 
need a blank disk, already initialized and formatted . 
for snapshots. If you use a disk with data on it (not 
counting other Wishbringer snapshots), that data may 
be destroyed. 

You can restore a saved place any time you want. 
To do so, type RESTORE at the prompt ( >), press 
the RETURN (or ENTER) key, and then follow the 
instructions on your Reference Card. You can then 
continue the story from the point where you used 
the SAVE command. You can type LOOK for a de- 
scription of where you are. 

Quitting and restarting: If you want to start over 
from the beginning, type RESTART and press the 
RETURN (or ENTER) key. (This is usually faster than 
re-booting.) Just to make sure, Wishbringer vfto. ask 
if you really want to start over. If vou do, tvpe Y or 
YES and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. 

If you want to stop entirely, tvpe QUIT and press 
the RETURN (or ENTER) key. Once again. Wish 
bringerwSL ask if this is really what you want to do. 

Remember when you RESTART or QUIT: if you 
want to be able to return to this point later, you must 
first use the SAVE command. 



Instruction Manual 17 



Appendix A 
Important Commands 

There are a number of one-word commands which 
you can type instead of a sentence . You can use them 
over and over whenever you want. Some count as a 
turn, and others do not. Type the command after the 
prompt (>) and press the RETURN (or ENTER) key. 

AGAIN — Wishbringer will usually respond as if you 
had repeated your previous sentence. (You can use 
the abbreviation G instead.) 

BRIEF— This tells Wishbringer to tell you all about a 
place or thing only the first time you see it. If you see 
it again later, Wishbringer mft tell you only its name. 
This is the normal wav that Wishbringer will act, 
unless you use the VERBOSE or SUPERBRIEF 
commands. 

INVENTORY— Wishbringer will list what you are 
carrying. (You can use the abbreviation I instead.) 

LOOK— This tells Wishbringer to describe the place 
you are in. (You can use the abbreviation L instead.) 

QUIT— This lets you stop. If you want to save your 
place before quitting, follow the instructions in the 
" Starting and Stopping" section on page 17. (You can 
use the abbreviation Q instead of QUIT.) 



RESTART— This stops the story and starts over from 
the beginning. 

RESTORE— This lets you continue from any point 
where you used the SAVE command. See 44 Starting 
and Stopping" on page 17 for details. 

SAVE— This puts a "snapshot" of your place in the 
story onto your storage disk. You can continue from 
the same place in the future by using the RESTORE 
command. See "Starting and Stopping 1 * on page 17 
for details. 

SCORE— Wishbringer will show you your current 
score and the number of turns you have taken. 

SCRIPT— This command tells your printer to begin 
making a transcript of the story as you play. A tran- 
script may help you remember, but you don't need it 
to play. It will work only on certain computers; read 
your Reference Card for details. 

SUPERBRIEF —This command s Wishbringer to tell 
you only the name of a place you have entered, even 
the first time you see it. Also, Wishbringer will not 
tell you what things are there. Of course, you can 
always get a description of a place, and the items 
there, by typing LOOK, In SUPERBRIEF mode, there 
is no blank line between turns. This mode is meant 
for players who are already very familiar with the 
geography. Also see VERBOSE and BRIEF. 



18 Instruction Manual 



TIME— This tells you the current time of day in the 
story. (You can use the abbreviation T instead.) 

UNSCRIPT— This commands your printer to stop 
making a transcript. Also see SCRIPT. 

VERBOSE— This tells Wishbringer to tell you all 
about a place or thing every time vou see it. Also see 
BRIEF and SUPERBRIEF, 

VERSION— This will show you the release number 
and the serial number of your copy of the story. 
Please send us this information if you ever report a 
"bug" in Wishbringer. 

WAIT— This will cause time to pass in the story. 
Normally, between turns, nothing happens in the 
story* You could leave your computer, take a nap. and 
return to the story to find that nothing has changed. 
You can type WAIT to make time pass in the story 
without doing anything. (You can use the abbrevia- 
tion Z instead of WAIL ) 



Appendix B 

Some Recognized Verbs 

This is only a partial list of the verbs that Wishbringer 
recognizes. There are many more, Remember that 
vou can use prepositions with them. For example, 
LOOK can become tOOK INSIDE, LOOK BEHIND, 
LOOK UNDER, LOOK THROUGH, LOOK AT and so 



on. 








ATTACK 


ENTER 


LISTEN 


SHOW 


BLOW 


EXAMINE 


LOOK 


SIT 


BREAK 


EXIT 


MOVE 


TAKE 


CLIMB 


FIND 


OPEN 


TELL 


CLOSE 


FOLLOW 


PULL 


THROW 


DESTROY 


GIVE 


PUSH 


UNLOCK 


DIVE 


KICK 


PUT 


WAIT 


DRINK 


KILL 


RAISE 


WALK 


DROP 


KISS 


READ 


YELL 


EAT 


KNOCK 


SEARCH 





Instruction Manual 19 



Appendix C 

Wishbringer Complaints 

1 1 hhhringer will complain if you type a sentence that 
confuses it completely. Wishbringer will then ignore 
the rest of the input tine. (Unusual events, such as 
being attacked, may also cause Wishbringer to ignore 
the rest of the sentences you typed, since the event 
may have changed your situation drastically.) Some 
of Wishbringer s complaints: 

SORRY, BUT THIS STORY DOESN'T RECOGNIZE THE 
WORD "[your word]." The word you typed is not in 
the program's list of words. Sometimes you can use 
another word that means the same thing. If not, 
Wishbringer probably can't understand what you 
were trying to do. 

SORRY, BUT THIS STORY CANT UNDERSTAND THE 
WORD "[your word]" WHEN YOU USE IT THAT 
WAY. Wishbringer knows the word you typed, but it 
couldn't understand it in that sense. Usually this is 
because Wishbringer knows the word as a different 
part of speech. For example, if you typed PR ESS THE 
LOWER BUTTON, you are using LOWER as an adjec- 
tive, but Wishbringer might know LOWER only as a 
verb, as in LOWER THE ROPE. 

THERE DO ESN 7 SEEM TO BE A VERB IN THAT SEN- 
TENCE! Unless you are answering a question, each 
sentence must have a verb (or a command) in it 
somewhere. 



THERE AREN'T ENOUGH NOUNS IN THAT SEN- 
TENCE! This usually means that your sentence was 
incomplete, such as PUT THE BOOK IN THE. 

THERE ARE TOO MANY NOUNS IN THAT SEN- 
TENCE. An example is PUT THE SOUP IN THE BOWL 
WITH THE LADLE, which has three noun "phrases," 
one more than Wishbringer can digest in a single 
action. 

BEG PARDON? You pressed the RETURN (or ENTER) 
key without typing anything. 

YOU CAN'T SEE ANY | thing! HERE! The tiling in 
your sentence was not visible. It may be somewhere 
else, inside a closed container, and so on. 

THE OTHER OBJECT [or OBJECTS] THAT YOU MEN- 
TIONED ISN'T [or AREN7I HERE. You used two or 
more nouns in the same sentence, and at least one of 
them wasn't visible. 

YOU CANT USE MORE THAN ONE DIRECT [or IN- 
DIRECT] OBJECT WITH "[your verb]." You can use 
multiple objects (that is, nouns or noun phrases sep- 
arated by AND or a comma) only with certain verbs 
like TAKE and DROP. You can't use more than one 
object with most verbs, like READ; so you can't 
READ THE ENVELOPE ANDTHE BOOK. 

SORRY BUT THAT SENTENCE DIDN'T MAKE SENSE. 
PLEASE REWORD IT OR TRY SOMETHING ELSE. 

Wishbringer thought the sentence you typed was 
nonsense, such as GIVE HIM WITH TOOL. Or, you 
may have typed a reasonable sentence but used a 
svntax that Wishbringer does not recognuie , such as 
SMELL UNDER THE ROCK. Try typing what you want 
to do in a different way. 



20 Instruction Manual 



Appendix D 

Sample Transcript and Map 

This transcript is not from Wishbringer, but it does 
show most of the usual things you can do in the 
story. It shows several simple puzzles and their 
solutions, and it should give you a good idea of how 
Infocom's interactive fiction works. The player's 
sentences appear in capital letters after each prompt 
(> ). The map represents the terrain in the sample 
transcript as you might have drawn it. 

You awake suddenly from a deep sleep. You are about 
to roll over and doze off again when you hear your 
unicorn, Harry, neighing outside. You get out of bed, 
turn on the light, and look under the pillow. Whew! 
There's Wishbringer, where you left it. But your wallet, 
which had been on the bedside table, is missing! 



BEDROOM 



CLOSET 



CGbKT 



LIVING 
ROOM 



r 



Porch 




OUTSIDE ( 

&OQC£T 
PUMP 



Bedroom 

You're standing in your bedroom, which Is small but 
comfortable* A closed door leads south into the living 
room. In a corner of the room sits a bedside table. Un- 
der the pillow on your bed is the magical stone, 
Wishbringer, 

> TAKE WISHBRINGER 
Taken. 

> GO SOUTH 

The bedroom door is closed, 

>OPEN THE BEDROOM DOOR 
Okay, the bedroom door is now open. 

>GO SOUTH 
Living Room 

This is your Cozy Living Room, one of the latest models 
from the Frobozz Magic Cozy Living Room Company. 
Two rocking chairs sit in front of a fireplace at one end of 
the room; a telephone rests on an oak desk at the other 
end. A small picture hangs above the fireplace* The 
closet door on the west wall is closed. 
A cool breeze blows through the open front door, which 
leads east onto your porch. 

> LOOK AT THE PICTURE 

The picture above the fireplace shows a small white 
farmhouse, not unlike your own. In red letters above the 
house are the words "Home Sweet Home." 
The cool breeze continues to blow through the open 
front door, making you shiver. 

> CLOSE THE FRONT DOOR 

You push the door against the wind and close it. Ah, 
that's better! 

> FfNDTHE WALLET 

You can't see any wallet here. Again, you hear your 
unicorn Harry neighing. 



OUT 



BARN 



Instruction Manual 21 



> GO OUTSIDE 

The front door is closed. 

> OPEN THE DOOR 

(Which door do you mean, the closet door or the front 
door?) 

> FRONT 

Okay, the front door is now open, A cool breeze blows 
into the room. 

> GO OUTSIDE 
Porch 

You're standing on the front porch of your home. The 
white paint is chipped, and the floorboards creak. To the 
south is the barn. It's chilly out here. You better not go 
anywhere without your coat* 

>GO INSIDE 
Living Room 

> OPEN TH E CLOSET DOOR 
Okay the closet door is now open. 

> GO INTO THE CLOSET 
Closet 

This is your cedar- lined closet. The aromas make you 
light-headed. Your coat and an umbrella are here, 

> TAKE THE COAT PUT IT ON 
Taken. 

Again, you hear your unicorn Harry neighing. 

Okay, you're now wearing the coat. 

>GO OUT THEN WALK EAST THEN SOUTH 
Living Room 

Porch 

Outside Barn 

Your red- and- black barn is here. That's odd; you 
thought your barn was yellow and green. You look 
again. Ah. That explains it— the red is the flames licking 
the walls of the silo, and the black is the thick smoke 
billowing from the door and windows. A bucket and a 
pump sit nearby. 



>GO INTO THE BARN 
The flames are too hot. 

> TAKE THE BUCKET. PUMP WATER INTOTHE 
BUCKET THEN POUR THE WATER ON THE BARN 
Taken. 

You rhythmically pump water into the bucket. There! The 
bucket is full of water. 

You pour the water on the barn and douse a few em- 
bers. However, the fire is out of control, and the blazing 
barn continues to burn. 

> LOOK FOR HARRY 
You can't see Harry here. 

> NORTH. WEST. GO IN THE CLOSET THEN TAKE 
THE UMBRELLA 

Porch 

Living Room 
Closet 

Okay you're now holding the umbrella. 

>GO INTOTHE LIVING ROOM THEN GO OUT. 
SOUTH, OPEN THE UMBRELLA 
Living Room 

Porch 

Outside Barn 

The umbrella is now open. 

>WISH FOR RAIN 

A searing bolt of lightning shatters the sky! It strikes the 
glowing Stone of Dreams, and fractures the sky into a 
billion raindrops. 

Everything around you is soaked in a brief but savage 
downpour. 

The raging fire dies down and is extinguished. 
>GO INTOTHE BARN 

Barn 

The inside of the barn is scorched and charred . Some 
smoking embers are scattered on the floor. A blackened 
horseshoe lies on the ground. 

> TAKE THE HORSESHOE 

The horseshoe is still too hot to pick up. 

>OUT 
Outside Barn 

> PUMP WATER INTOTHE BUCKET 

You rhythmically pump water into the bucket. There! The 
bucket is full of water. 



22 Instruction Manual 



>GO IN THE BARN. POUR THE WATER ONTO THE 

HORSESHOE 

Barn 

A blackened horseshoe lies on the ground. 

At first the horseshoe sizzles as you pour the water over 
it. Then it cools and just gets wet. 

> TAKE THE HORSESHOE 

You're carrying too many things already I 

> INVENTORY 

You're carrying Wishbringer, an umbrella, a coat (being 
worn) and a bucket. 

> DROP THE UMBREKKA 

(Sorry, but this story doesn't recognize the word 
"umbrekka".) 

> DROP THE UMBRELLA 
Dropped. 

> TAKE THE HORSESHOE 
Taken. 

>WISH FOR LUCK 

The Stone of Dreams brightens as you speak the Wish, 
and the edges of the blackened horseshoe begin to 
twinkle with Luck. 

You hear the phone ringing inside the house. 

>GO NORTH THEN WEST 
Porch 

You hear the phone ringing inside the house. 

Living Room 

The phone is ringing. 

> ANSWER THE PHONE 

You pick up the receiver. It's the police calling! They tell 
you that they've just caught a thief, the Mad Arsonist of 
Festeron, and they found your wallet! You thank them 
and hang up the phone. Then you hear someone — or 
something — outside. 

> GO OUTSIDE 
Porch 

Here's Harry! He's soaking wet, which unicorns hate, 
but he's obviously happy to see you. 

> PET HARRY 

Harry nudges you fondly with his horn and looks at you 
lovingly with his gentle brown eyes. 



Appendix E 

We're Never Satisfied 

Here at Infocom, we take great pride in the quality of 
our stories. Even after they're in your hands, we still 
want to make them better. 

Your input is important. No matter how much 
testing we do, it seems that some "bugs" never 
crawl into view until thousands of you begin doing all 
those wild and crazy things in the story. If you find a 
"bug " or if you think a certain puzzle was too hard 
or too easy, or if you have some other suggestion, or 
if you'd just like to tell us what you thought of the 
story, write to us! We love an excuse to stop work- 
ing, and a letter from you would be just such an ex- 
cuse! Write to: 

INFOCOM, INC. 
125 CambridgePark Drive 
Cambridge, MA 02140 
Attn: Mr. Crisp 

Appendix F 

If You Have Technical Problems 

You can call the Infocom Technical Support Team to 
report "bugs" and technical problems, but not for 
hints to solve puzzles, at (617) 576-3190. If your disk 
fails within ninety (90) days after purchase, we will 
replace it at no charge. Otherwise, we will replace it 
for a fee of $5 (U.S. currency). If you call to report a 
"bug" please provide your release number, which 
you can find by typing the command VERSION . 
Please mail us your registration card if you'd like to 
be on our mailing list and receive our newsletter, The 
New Zork Times. 



Instruction Manual 23 



Appendix G 
About the Author 

"Professor" Brian Moriarty built his first computer 
in the fifth grade. This early experience with elec- 
tronics led him to seek a degree in English Literature 
at Southeastern Massachusetts University, where 
he graduated in 1978. He lives near the bridge in 
Historic Concord, does not hate children, and is a 
member in good standing of the Nathaniel 
Hawthorne Society. Wishbringeris his first work of 
interactive fiction. 



Appendix H 

Copyright and Warranty Information 

Limited Warranty 

This software product and the attached instructional materials are 
sold AS IS," without warranty as to their performance. The entire 
risk as to the quality and performance of the computer software pro- 
gram is assumed by the user. 

However, to the original purchaser of a disk prepared by Infocom 
and carrying the Infocom label on the disk jacket, Infocom. Inc. war- 
rants the medium on which the program is recorded to be free from 
defects in materials and faulty workmanship under normal use and 
service for a period of ninety (90) days from the date of purchase. If 
during this period a defect on the medium should occur, the medium 
may be returned to Infocom, Inc. or to an authorized Infocom, Inc. 
dealer, and Infocom. Inc. will replace the medium without charge to 
you. Your sole and exclusive remedy in the event of a defect is ex- 
pressly limited to replacement of the medium as provided above. This 
warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other 
rights which vary from state to state. 

THE ABOVE WARRANTIES FOR GOODS ARE IN LIEU OF 
ALL WARRANTIES. EXPRESS, IMPLIED, OR STATUTORY, IN- 
CLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ANY IMPLIED WARRAN- 
TIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A 
PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND OF ANY OTHER WARRANTY OB- 
LIGATION ON THE PART OF INFOCOM. INC. SOME STATES 
DO NOT ALLOW LIMITATIONS ON HOW LONG AN IMPLIED 
WARRANTY LASTS, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY NOT 
APPLY TO YOU. IN NO EVENT SHALL INFOCOM, INC. OR 
ANYONE ELSE WHO HAS BEEN INVOLVED IN THE CREATION 
AND PRODUCTION OF THIS COMPUTER SOFTWARE PRO- 
GRAM BE LIABLE FOR INDIRECT, SPECIAL, OR CONSE- 
QUENTIAL DAMAGES. SUCH AS, RUT NOT LIMITED TO, LOSS 
OF ANTICIPATED PROFITS OR BENEFITS RESULTING FROM 
THE USE OF THIS PROGRAM. OR ARISING OUT OF ANY 
BREACH OF THIS WARRANTY. SOME STATES DO NOT ALLOW 
THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF INCIDENTAL OR CON- 
SEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SO THE ABOVE LIMITATION MAY 
NOT APPLY TO YOU . 

N.B. After the warranty period, a defective Infocom disk may be 
returned to Infocom. Inc. with a check or money order for $5.00 U.S. 
currency for replacement. 

Copyright 

The enclosed software product is copyrighted and all rights are re- 
served by Infocom, Inc. It is published exclusively by Infocom, Inc. 
The distribution and sale of this product are intended for the use of 
the original purchaser only and for use only on the computer system 
specified. Lawful users of this program are hereby licensed only to 
read the program from its medium into memory of a computer solely 
for the purpose of executing the program. Copying (except for one 
backup copy on those systems which provide for it— see Reference 
Card), duplicating, selling, or otherwise distributing this product is a 
violation of the law. 

This manual and all other documentation contained herein are copy- 
righted and all rights reserved by Infocom. Inc. These documents 
may not, in whole or in part, be copied, photocopied, reproduced, 
translated, or rvduceil to any electronic medium or machine -readable 
form without prior consent, in writing, from Infocom, Inc. 

Willful violations of the Copyright Law of the United States can 
result in civil damages of up to $50,000 in addition to actual damages, 
plus criminal penalties of up to one year imprisonment and/or $10,000 
fine. 

Wishbrirtger is a trademark of Infocom. Inc. 
€'1985 Infocom. Inc. 
Printed in U.S.A. 



24 Instruction Manual 




Appendix I 

Quick Reference Guide 

1. To start the story ("boot up"), see the separate 
Reference Card in your Wishbringer package. 

2. When you see the prompt ( > ) on your screen, 
Wishbringer is waiting for your command. There are 
three kinds of commands that Wtskbringer 
understands: 

A. Direction commands: To move from place to 
place, just tvpe the direction you want to go: N (or 
NORTH), E, S, W, U (or UP), D, IN, OUT. 

B. Actions: Just tvpe whatever you want to do. 
Some examples: READ THE BOOK or OPEN THE 
DOOR or WISH FOR RAIN or LOOK THROUGH 
THE WINDOW. Once you're familiar with simple 
commands, you'll want to use more complex 
ones; they're described in "Communicating with 
Wishbringer' on page 14. 

C. Special one -word commands: Some one -word 
commands, such as INVENTORY or VERBOSE, 
give you specific information or affect your output. 
A list of these appears in the "Important Com- 
mands" appendix on page 18. 



3. Important! After typing your sentence or com- 
mand, you must press the RETURN (or ENTER) key 
before Wishbringer respond. 

4. On most computers, your screen will have a spe- 
cial line called the status line. It tells you the name of 
the place you 're in and the time of day in the story. 

5. You can pick up and carry many of the items you'll 
find in the story. For example, if you type TAKE THE 
ENVELOPE, you will be carrying it. Type INVEN- 
TORY to see a list of the items you are earning. 

6. When you want to stop, save your place for later, 
or start over, read the "Starting and Stopping" sec- 
tion on page 17. 

7. If you have trouble, look at a specific section of the 
manual for more detailed instructions. 



Instruction Manual 25